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Kashmiryoga

Kashmiryoga here stands for the hatha yoga teachings of Jean Klein. Jean Klein taught hatha yoga in the tradition of Kashmir. He himself called it 'bodywork'. To him the word 'yoga' was inappropriate and the usual explication "connection of the individual self with the absolute Self" nonsense. According to his experience all is one and what remains then to be connected? In the teachings of Jean Klein the bodywork was an integral part of his approach.

In Kashmiryoga the emphasis is not so much on the physical body (annamaya kosha), but on the energybody (pranamaya kosha). Owing to this the deeper layers of feeling are aroused and the bodywork has a stronger transforming effect. Jean Klein (Etre 1981/1): "This approach brings about an awakening of all virtual energies and enables them to fully enfold. These energies are then guided into a vertical course, which brings our whole structure to this verticality. This work generates a forefeeling of the truth. This path leads us to a meditative attitude. This meditative state, which is not a cerebral function, is a presence without objects, which is thereupon lived while objects are present."

During yogapractice an 'impersonal' attitude is adopted. That means that no mental images of oneself as a person are projected. During practice one listens to the body with an open mind, without prejudices or mental projections, without psychological reactions and without any striving for goals.

During such practice, the energybody can be activated by:

  • working with the tactile sense and tactile imagination
  • eliminating resistances in the spinal column
  • working with postures (asanas) that are capable to decondition the body and stimulate the energy
  • working with breath
Then the deeper layers of sensitivity awaken, body and mind become free and one becomes "open to the Openness".

In consultation with Jean Klein the bodywork is described by Koos Zondervan (in Dutch) in 'Yoga volgens de Kashmirmethode' (Trika, 1996). Because many aspects of both the spiritual teachings of Jean Klein and his yoga-approach stem from the tradition of Kashmir, at the request of Jean Klein a translation of one of his favourite texts, the Vijnana Bhairava was added to the book.

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